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Discussion papers
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-2018-26
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.
https://doi.org/10.5194/dwes-2018-26
© Author(s) 2019. This work is distributed under
the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 License.

Research article 04 Jan 2019

Research article | 04 Jan 2019

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This discussion paper is a preprint. It has been under review for the journal Drinking Water Engineering and Science (DWES). The manuscript was not accepted for further review after discussion.

Froth Production in Potable Water without Chemicals

Ghanim Hassan1 and Robert G. J. Edyvean2 Ghanim Hassan and Robert G. J. Edyvean
  • 1Department of Water Resources Techniques, Middle Technical University, Baghdad, Iraq
  • 2Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, The University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK

Abstract. Froth flotation is a well-known solid-liquid separation technique. Hydrophobicity is the main driving force for such processes. Hydrophobic solids attach to air bubbles and rise up while hydrophilic or less hydrophobic species settle down. Froth can be produced with chemical frothers such as alcohols and polyglycols. However, the use of chemicals limits the use of this separation method in applications such as drinking water, food, and pharmaceutical industries. Therefore, developing a technique that produces froth without adding any chemicals would be useful to such industries.

This work demonstrates that with suitable operating parameters a 27 cm froth height can be obtained in a 20 cm diameter column by using an air flow rate of 130 l/min.

Ghanim Hassan and Robert G. J. Edyvean
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Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
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Interactive discussion
Status: closed
Status: closed
AC: Author comment | RC: Referee comment | SC: Short comment | EC: Editor comment
Printer-friendly Version - Printer-friendly version Supplement - Supplement
Ghanim Hassan and Robert G. J. Edyvean
Ghanim Hassan and Robert G. J. Edyvean
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Short summary
Froth flotation is a well-known solid-liquid separation technique. Hydrophobicity is the main driving force for such processes. Hydrophobic solids attach to air bubbles and rise up while hydrophilic or less hydrophobic species settle down. Unfortunately, when dealing with drinking water, it is not allowed to add any chemical fothers that needed to such a process because it may deteriorate the water quality. This work summarizes how to skip this difficulty and produce froth without chemicals.
Froth flotation is a well-known solid-liquid separation technique. Hydrophobicity is the main...
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